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Coronavirus Food Assistance Program 2 FAQ

Frequently Asked Questions

Last Updated: October 22, 2020

Eligibility

Q: Who is eligible to participate in the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program 2?

A: Any individual or legal entity who shares in the risk of producing a commodity may apply for CFAP 2. Producers must be in the business of farming at the time of submitting their application to be eligible. Commodities grown under a contract in which the grower has ownership and production risk are eligible for CFAP 2. Producers can apply for assistance for only commercially produced commodities.

Q: Are urban farmers and farmers who run community supported agriculture (CSA) operations eligible?

A: All farmers, including urban farmers and farmers who run CSAs, are eligible for CFAP 2 if they meet the eligibility requirements.

Q: I don’t participate in any USDA programs. Can I apply for CFAP 2?

A: Yes. Participation in other USDA programs is not a prerequisite.

Q: Should a marketing cooperative apply, or should each grower apply separately for CFAP 2?

A: Each grower should apply separately.

Q: Is there an Adjusted Gross Income (AGI) limit to participate in CFAP 2?

A: Yes. To be eligible to receive payment, a person’s or legal entity’s AGI cannot exceed $900,000 (using the average for the 2016, 2017, and 2018 tax years). However, producers with AGI exceeding the limit may be eligible to receive payment if 75 percent or more of their total AGI comes from farming, ranching, or forestry-related activities.

Q: Who must fill out forms to certify average AGI and Farm AGI?

A: Forms CCC-941 and, when applicable, CCC-942, are used for certifying average AGI and Farm AGI and are required to be filed by the applicant. The individual or a legal entity applying must provide information on all members, stockholders, or partners at or above the fourth level of ownership in the business structure.

Q: Do the Farm Bill’s conservation compliance requirements apply to CFAP 2?

A: Producers participating in CFAP 2 must be in compliance with the highly erodible land conservation and wetland conservation provisions at 7 CFR Part 12. Producers must agree, by certifying Form AD-1026, that they will not produce an agricultural commodity on highly erodible land without a conservation plan, plant an agricultural commodity on a converted wetland, or convert a wetland to make possible the production of an agricultural commodity.

Q: Is there a crop insurance or risk management requirement that must be met to qualify for CFAP 2?

A: Similar to CFAP 1, there is no requirement to have crop insurance coverage or coverage under the Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program (NAP) to be eligible for participation in CFAP 2.

Q: Does participation in Small Business Administration programs impact CFAP 2 eligibility?

A: Participation in SBA’s Paycheck Protection Program or Economic Injury Disaster Loan program does not impact producer eligibility for CFAP 2. The PPP duplicate benefit provision does not have an impact on FSA farm programs or farm loan programs.

Q: Is a contract grower eligible for CFAP 2?

A: A person or legal entity that grows or produces an eligible commodity or livestock under contract for someone else is not eligible. To be eligible for CFAP 2, a person or legal entity must raise or grow an eligible commodity and have both ownership and risk of production loss in the commodity or livestock.

 

Eligible Commodities

Q: What commodities and livestock are eligible for CFAP 2?

A: Eligible commodities for CFAP 2 include non-specialty crops, wool, livestock (excluding breeding stock), dairy, specialty crops, floriculture and nursery crops, aquaculture, broilers and eggs, and tobacco. See a full list of eligible commodities at farmers.gov/cfap.

Q: What commodities are not eligible for CFAP 2?

A: Commodities not eligible for CFAP 2 include:

  • Hay, except for alfalfa, and crops intended for grazing 
  • All equine, breeding stock, companion or comfort animals, pets, and animals raised for hunting or game purposes 
  • Birdsfoot and trefoil, clover, cover crop, fallow, forage soybeans, forage sorghum, gardens (commercial and home), grass, kochia (prostrata), lespedeza, milkweed, mixed forage, pelts (excluding mink), perennial peanuts, pollinators (bees, for example), sunn hemp, vetch, and seed of ineligible crops.

Q: Why isn’t breeding stock eligible for CFAP 2?

A: The payments to livestock are focused on market inventory because there are limited funds available for CFAP 2 and the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) authority that fully funds the program is meant to assist with costs associated with market disruptions. Breeding stock is typically kept for many years and therefore their value is less likely to be impacted by temporary price impacts. Non-breeding animals are more likely to be sold and therefore more likely impacted by market value changes.

Q: Are seed commodities eligible for CFAP 2?

A: Seed commodities are eligible if the underlying commodity is eligible and at the underlying commodity payment category and rate. For example, seed potatoes and asparagus seed are covered under the sales approach while seed corn is a price trigger commodity. Clover seed is not eligible since the underlying commodity is not eligible.

Q: If a producer sells eggs locally, are they eligible?

A: Producers who sell eggs locally are encouraged to apply. The FSA county committee will determine if the production of eggs is commercial. Because applications are subject to spot check, producers should also have verifiable sales and/or production records to substantiate their certifications on the application form.

Q: If I participate in a marketing or seasonal pool to market my pecans, a sales-based commodity, are those sales eligible?

A: Yes, the sales-based commodity is eligible based on the sales received for your commodity in calendar year 2019, regardless of membership in a marketing pool or crop year from which the commodity was produced.

Q: Are freshwater shrimp eligible?

A: Yes, provided the shrimp are propagated and maintained in a controlled environment.

Q: Are alligators sold for food considered specialty livestock or aquaculture?          

A: Alligators are not eligible as they are not aquaculture and are not an included as eligible other livestock.

Application

Q: When does CFAP 2 signup start and end?

A: Producers may apply for CFAP 2 from September 21, 2020 to December 11, 2020.

Q: Do all producers need to apply through the Farm Service Agency?

A: Yes. Producers of eligible commodities may apply on or after September 21 through their local Farm Service Agency (FSA) at their USDA Service Center or online. Producers can locate their service center, download the application forms, and find additional information about applying at farmers.gov/cfap or by calling 877-508-8364.

Q: I applied for CFAP 1. Do I still need to apply for CFAP 2?

A: Yes, CFAP 2 is a separate program. You will not automatically be signed up because you applied or received a payment under CFAP 1.

Q: I didn’t apply for CFAP 1. Can I apply for CFAP 2?

A: Yes, there is no requirement to participate in CFAP 1 in order to participate in CFAP 2.

Q: How can I prepare to apply for CFAP 2?

A: If you are a new customer to USDA, your local FSA staff will work with you to fill out the application for the program, and will ask for this type of information:

  • Name and address
  • Personal information, including your Tax Identification Number
  • Farm operating structure
  • Adjusted Gross Income compliance certification to ensure eligibility
  • Direct deposit information to enable payment

If you received a payment under CFAP 1, your office likely has this information on file.

Q: What documents do I need to submit with my application?

A: To complete the CFAP 2 application, producers will need to reference their sales, inventory, and other records. However, since CFAP 2 is a self-certification program, this documentation will not need to be submitted with the application. Because applications are subject to County Committee review and spot check, some producers will be required to provide documentation. Producers should retain the records and documentation they use to complete the application.

If a producer willfully makes and represents as true any verbal or written declaration, certification, statement, or verification that the producer knows or believes not to be true, in the course of either applying for or participating in CFAP 2, or both, the producer will be subject to prosecution under Federal criminal and civil fraud statutes.

Q: My local USDA Service Center is not open for walk-in service. How do I apply for CFAP 2?

A: All USDA Service Centers are open for business, including some that are open to visitors to conduct business in person by appointment only. All producers wishing to conduct business with FSA should call ahead and schedule an appointment. Alternatively, you may call 877-508-8364 to speak with an FSA employee and take the first steps toward application.

Service Centers that are open for appointments will pre-screen visitors based on health concerns or recent travel, and visitors must adhere to social distancing guidelines. Visitors are also required to wear a face covering during their appointment.

You can find the phone number and the location of your local USDA Service Center at farmers.gov/cfap and view the status of your local Service Center at farmers.gov/coronavirus/service-center-status.

Q: Where can I get a CFAP 2 application?

A: USDA’s Farm Service Agency will offer multiple ways for producers to apply beginning on September 21. Visit farmers.gov/cfap/apply to learn about application options, which include applying online, manually completing the application form, or filling out the application form with a payment calculator.

Note: If you will be filing an application for commodities identified as “acreage-based crops,” the acreage and yield information must be provided by FSA through the annual acreage reporting process, either through an application initiated by USDA Service Center staff or by applying online.

Q: Are CFAP 2 funds a loan that must be repaid? Is there a fee to apply?

A: No. CFAP 2 is not a loan program and there is no cost to apply.

 

Producer Payments

Q: How much is USDA spending through CFAP 2 to directly support producers negatively impacted by COVID-19?

A: CFAP 2 will provide up to $14 billion in direct support for agricultural producers of eligible commodities who continue to face market disruptions and associated costs due to COVID-19.

Q: The impacts of COVID-19 on agriculture producers are significant. What if you run out of funding?

A: USDA rigorously analyzed the impacts of market disruptions and associated costs caused by COVID-19 on production agriculture. This analysis was used to determine how much funding would be needed in conjunction with the effects of payment limitations and adjusted gross income limits. This analysis can be found at farmers.gov/cfap.

Q: I started farming in 2020 and grow a commodity that is part of the sales approach. I didn’t have any 2019 sales. Can I participate in CFAP 2?

A: Yes, you can participate in CFAP 2. New producer payments will be based on 2020 actual sales as of the date of their application.

Q: When are CFAP 2 payments expected to begin?

A: FSA county offices will process applications as they receive them once the application period opens on September 21, 2020. Program approval is handled at the local level and the timeline for this approval process, including required internal controls and data validation, varies from county to county. Payments are made shortly after applications are approved.

Q: What are the payment limits for CFAP 2?

A: The total CFAP 2 payment that a person or legal entity may receive, directly through their application or indirectly through attribution of entity payments, is $250,000. This payment limitation is separate from the CFAP 1 payment limit. This limitation applies to the total amount of CFAP 2 payments made with respect to all eligible commodities.

The total amount of CFAP 2 payments made to a legal entity – such as to a corporation, limited liability corporation, limited partnership, trust, or estate – is $250,000 except if:

  • two different members of the legal entity each provide at least 400 hours of active personal labor, active personal management, or combination thereof with respect to the production of 2020 commodities, then an entity may receive up to $500,000. 
  • three different members of the legal entity each provide at least 400 hours of active personal labor, active personal management, or combination thereof with respect to the production of 2020 commodities, then an entity may receive up to $750,000. 

Although the payment limitation is increased for the corporation, LLC, LP, trust, or estate, each members’ payment limitation (received directly or indirectly) remains subject to the $250,000 individual person payment limit.

These payment limit provisions are different from and separate from the payment limitations established by the 2018 Farm Bill.

Q: Can CFAP 2 payments be withheld to satisfy a debt?

A: No. Per the CFAP 2 regulation, these payments will not be subject to administrative offset. This mean the payments will not be withheld to satisfy any USDA debts nor will they be offset by Treasury.

 

Funding and Payment Calculations

Q: Where did USDA get the funding for CFAP 2?

A: Funding for CFAP 2, with the exception of tobacco, will be provided by the Secretary under the authority of the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) Charter Act (Section 5 (b), (d) and (e)). Congress provided a $14 billion replenishment of the CCC in the CARES Act for Coronavirus relief for agriculture that became available in mid-July.

Tobacco funding is authorized by the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act (P.L.116-136), not to exceed $100 million.

Q:  Will USDA conduct a NOFA process to add commodities that do not meet the 5 percent-or-greater price decline as they did in CFAP 1?

A: No. The list of commodities eligible for CFAP 2 is quite comprehensive. USDA covered impacted commodities in three categories that include (1) price trigger commodities that have realized a 5 percent-or-greater price decline (as calculated from readily available data); (2) flat rate commodities that are crops that either do not meet the 5-percent price decline trigger or do not have data available to calculate a price change, but will receive CFAP 2 payments based on eligible acres of the crop planted in 2020; and (3) a sales approach for specialty commodities that uses 2019 gross sales of eligible commodities as a proxy for 2020 marketings.

Q: What commodities are included in the three different categories that USDA has established to assist producers impacted by COVID-19 and what are the payment rates?

A: Price trigger commodities and the rates are:

Commodity Unit Standard Crop Marketing Percentage** Payment Rate ($/unit)
Barley bu 63 $0.54
Corn bu 40 $0.58
Cotton, Upland lb 46 $0.08
Sorghum bu 55 $0.56
Soybeans bu 54 $0.58
Sunflowers lb 44 $0.02
Wheat (all classes) bu 73 $0.54

**Crop payment = reported 2020 planted acres times yield times standard crop marketing percentage times payment rate

Livestock Unit Payment Rate ($/unit)
Broilers head $1.01**
Beef Cattle head $55.00
Hogs and Pigs head $23.00
Lambs and Sheep head $27.00

Livestock payment = unit times payment rate

** Payment does not cover the entire year.

Commodity Unit Payment Rate ($/Unit)
Dairy hundredweight $1.20**
Shell Eggs dozen $0.05**
Liquid Eggs lb $0.04**
Dried Eggs lb $0.14**
Frozen Eggs lb $0.05**

** Payment does not cover the entire year.

Flat-rate commodities are:

Alfalfa Amaranth Grain Buckwheat Canola
Cotton, ELS Crambe (colewort) Einkorn Emmer
Flax Guar Hemp Indigo
Industrial Rice Kenaf Khorasan Millet
Mustard Oats Peanuts Quinoa
Rapeseed Rice Rice, sweet Rice, wild
Rye Safflower Sesame Speltz
Sugar Beets Sugarcane Teff Triticale

Flat rate commodity payment = $15 per acre times 2020 planted acres 

Sales approach uses 2019 gross sales of eligible commodities as a proxy for 2020 marketings. Eligible sales only include sales of raw commodities grown by the producer. Payments are based on five payment ranges associated with their 2019 sales. Commodities included are:

  • Specialty crops
  • Aquaculture grown in a controlled environment
  • Livestock not included under the price trigger category that were grown for food, fiber, fur, or feathers (contract growers without price risk are not eligible)
  • Tobacco
  • Goat milk
  • Mink (including pelts)
  • Mohair
  • Wool
  • Nursery and floriculture crops. 

Payments are made based on the producer’s 2019 sales of eligible commodities in a declining block format using the following payment rate factors:

2019 Sales Range Percent Payment Factor for the Producer’s 2019 Sales
of Eligible Commodities Falling in the Range
$0 to $49,999 10.6%
$50,000 to $99,999 9.9%
$100,000 to $499,999 9.7%
$500,000 to $999,999 9.0%
Sales over $1 million 8.8%

Example: A producer’s 2019 sales of eligible commodities totaled $75,000. The payment is calculated as ($49,999 times 10.6%) plus ($25,001 times 9.9%) equals a total payment of $7,775. 

Q: How did USDA determine which commodities were price trigger commodities?

A: Commodities included in the price trigger category are those with a 5 percent-or-greater price decline from readily available data.

  • Crops: CFAP 2 payments are targeted to marketings of 2020 produced commodities in the third and fourth quarters of calendar year 2020. If there was a 5-percent-or-greater price decline comparing the average price for the week of January 13-17, 2020, and the average price for the week of July 27-31, 2020, the crop is eligible based on its price decline.
  • Dairy: The average futures price decline for milk from mid-January to late-July was about 12 percent.  An 80 percent factor is applied to the price difference and the payment rate is further adjusted to reflect the portion of the second quarter impacts covered under CFAP 1.
  • Beef Cattle: Between the week of January 13-17, 2020, and July 27-31, 2020 the December live cattle futures contract average price fell by 10 percent. Producers chose their maximum owned inventory, excluding breeding stock, on a date they select from April 16, 2020 through August 31, 2020.
  • Hogs and Pigs: Between the week of January 13-17, 2020, and July 27-31, 2020, the December lean hog futures contract average price fell by 26 percent. Producers chose their maximum owned inventory, excluding breeding stock, on a date they select from April 16, 2020 through August 31, 2020.
  • Sheep and Lambs: The average mid-January to late-July price difference for market lambs and market sheep (excluding breeding stock) as reported by USDA’s Agricultural Marketing Service, was 26 percent. Producers chose their highest owned inventory, excluding breeding stock, on a date from April 16, 2020 through August 31, 2020.
  • Broilers: The average mid-January to late-July price decline, as reported by USDA’s Agricultural Marketing Service, was 29 percent. Payments are made on 75 percent of the producer’s 2019 broiler production in which the producer had risk.
  • Eggs: Under CFAP 2, rates are established for table eggs (those eggs intended for food use). All four uses are determined to be eligible for CFAP 2, based on a 5 percent price trigger and payments are made based on 2019 production.

Q: I grow a commodity classified as a price trigger commodity.  How is my payment calculated?

A: For crops that experienced an average 5 percent-or-greater price decline between mid-January to late-July, eligible acres of the crop, as reported to FSA on the crop acreage report, are multiplied by the applicable yield, multiplied by the crop marketing percentage, multiplied by the crop payment rate. For producers with crop insurance, the yield will be the weighted average of the producer’s 2020 actual production history (APH) approved yield from all of the producer’s insured acres nationwide. Where this data is unavailable, the yield will be the weighted 2019 Agriculture Risk Coverage-County Option (ARC-CO) benchmark yield multiplied by 85 percent. Depending on the yield for a given producer’s crop in this category, the payment may calculate to less than $15 per acre. In such cases, the payment will be $15 per acre, which is the payment for the flat-rate category discussed below. Your FSA county office will assist in these calculations.

Payments for beef cattle will be based on a fixed number head, which is equal to the lower of the producer’s maximum owned inventory of eligible beef cattle, excluding breeding stock, on a date selected by the producer from April 16, 2020, through August 31, 2020, multiplied by the payment rate of $55 per head.

Payments for hogs and pigs will be based on a fixed number of head, which is equal to the lower of the producer’s maximum owned inventory of eligible hogs and pigs, excluding breeding stock, on a date selected by the producer from April 16, 2020, through August 31, 2020, multiplied by a payment rate of $23 per head.

Payments for market lambs and market sheep will be equal to the highest inventory of eligible lambs and sheep, excluding breeding stock, on a day chosen by the applicant from April 16, 2020, through August 31, 2020, multiplied by a payment rate of $27 per head.

Payments for broilers will be equal to 75 percent of 2019 eligible broiler production multiplied by a payment rate of $1.01 per bird.

Payments for dairy (cow milk) will be equal to the sum of the following two calculations:

  • Actual milk production from April 1, 2020, to August 31, 2020, multiplied by the payment $1.20 per hundredweight; and
  • The estimated milk production from September 1, 2020, to December 31, 2020, based on the daily average production from April 1, 2020, through August 31, 2020, multiplied by 122, multiplied by a payment rate of $1.20 per hundredweight.

Payments for eggs will be equal to 75 percent of 2019 eligible egg production multiplied by the payment rate.

Q: I grow a commodity included in the flat rate category. How will my payment be calculated?

A: Producers of these commodities receive a $15 per-acre payment based on their 2020 planted acres of the crop, excluding prevented planted or experimental acres, as reported to FSA on the crop acreage report.

Q: I grow tobacco on my farm. Will I receive a payment?

A: Tobacco is included under the sales approach. Payments are made based on the producer’s 2019 sales of tobacco and other commodities included in the category times each payment percentage. For example, a producer’s 2019 sales of tobacco and eligible commodities totaled $75,000. The payment is calculated as ($49,999 times 10.6%) plus ($25,001 times 9.9%) equals a total payment of $7,775.

Q: What if I don’t have a 2020 actual production history (APH) approved yield?

A: For producers for whom FSA is unable to obtain a 2020 APH approved yield, the yield will be the 2019 Agriculture Risk Coverage-County Option (ARC-CO) benchmark yield multiplied by 85 percent. ARC-CO yields for producers growing a crop in multiple counties will be weighted based on the producer’s crop acreage physically located in each county.

Q. What if I don’t have a 2020 FSA-578 crop acreage report on file with FSA?

A: Producers who are applying for payment for price trigger or flat-rate crops must file a report of all acreage for the crop on FSA-578, Report of Acreage. If a producer has not completed a crop acreage report for 2020, a late filed report will be accepted. If the producer is filing the FSA-578 for CFAP 2 purposes only, there will be no late-file fee or farm inspection.

Q: What if I am a new producer of eggs, broilers, or the sales commodities in 2020 and have no 2019 revenue?

A: Payments for such producers will be based on the producer’s actual 2020 production or sales as of the date the producer submits an application.

Q: What if I am a producer of eggs, broilers, or the sales commodities and only farmed for part of 2019?

A: Payments for such producers will still be based on the producer’s actual 2019 production or sales.

Q: What milk production is eligible for CFAP 2?

A: Any milk that was commercially marketed from April through December of 2020 is eligible for payment under CFAP 2. Production for September, October, November, and December will be based on the average production from April to August.

Q: Are animals that have been depopulated because of the impact of COVID-19 on processing facilities included in CFAP 2?

A: Animals that are a part of a producer’s inventory on the date he/she chooses are eligible for a CFAP 2 payment.

Q: Are “replacement stock intended for breeding” cattle, hogs/pigs, sheep, and other livestock eligible?

A: Yes. All females that have not produced offspring and males who have not started breeding females are eligible for inclusion in inventory. Breeding stock such as cows, bulls, sows, boars, ewes, and rams are not eligible for CFAP 2. Culled breeding stock are also not eligible for CFAP 2.

Q: I have a contract with a company to produce broilers. Am I eligible?

A: Commodities grown under a contract in which the grower has ownership and production risk are eligible for CFAP 2.

Q: What type of eggs are eligible under CFAP 2?

A: Shell, liquid, frozen, and dried eggs are eligible for CFAP 2 payments.

 

Sales Commodities

Q: What is included in the 2019 sales used to calculate payments?

A: Eligible sales only includes sales of raw commodities grown by the producer. Any portion of sales derived from adding value to the commodity, such as processing and packaging, and from sales of products purchased for resale, are not included in 2019 sales for a CFAP 2 payment. The amount of sales to be included is sales received in calendar year 2019. 

Q: How will producers who process their own crop instead of selling the raw commodity determine the farm gate value?

A: Producers will certify to the value of the commodity at the farm gate. The producer must be able to provide the basis they used to convert sales to the value of the raw commodity, which will need to be determined reasonable and acceptable by the reviewing authority, if selected for spot check.

Q: Will FSA provide guidance on how to remove the processing or packaging value for producers with commodities that are sold with processing or packaging?

A: The amount of sales is based on the producer’s certification of sales. The producer has the burden of supporting the methodology used to convert value-added sales to raw product when asked.  A recommended conversion factor is provided to FSA staff for conversion of maple syrup to the value of the raw maple sap.

Q: What other livestock will be considered under this category of payment?

A: Other livestock means any of the following livestock: animals commercially raised for food, fur, fiber, or feathers, including alpacas, bison, buffalo, beefalo, deer, ducks, elk, emus, geese, goats, guinea pigs, llamas, mink, ostrich, pheasants, quail, rabbits, reindeer, turkey, water buffalo, and yak.

CFAP 2 excludes all equine, breeding stock, companion or comfort animals, pets, and animals raised for hunting or game purposes.

You can learn more about livestock eligible for CFAP at farmers.gov/cfap/specialty-livestock and farmers.gov/cfap/livestock.

Q: What tree nuts are included?

A: The following tree nuts are eligible for CFAP 2: almonds, avocados, carob, cashew, chestnuts, coffee, hazel nuts, jojoba, macadamia nuts, noni, olives, pecans, persimmons, pine nuts, pistachios, quinces, and walnuts.

Q: What vegetables are eligible for CFAP 2?

A: The following vegetables are eligible for CFAP 2: alfalfa sprouts, aloe vera, artichokes, arugula (greens), asparagus, bamboo shoots, batatas, bean sprouts, beans (including dry edible), beets, bok choy, broccoflower, broccoli, broccolini, broccolo-cavalo, Brussel sprouts, cabbage, calaloo, carrots, cauliflower, celeriac, celery, chickpea (see beans, garbanzo), chives, collard greens, coriander, corn, sweet, cucumbers, daikon, dandelion greens, dasheen (taro root, malanga), dill, eggplant, endive, escarole, frisee, gailon (gai lein, Chinese broccoli), garlic, gourds, greens, horseradish, Jerusalem artichokes (sunchoke), kale, kohlrabi, leeks, lentils, lettuce, melongene, mesculin mix, microgreens, mushrooms, okra, onions, parsnip, peas (including dry edible), pejibaye (heart of palm), peppers, potatoes, potatoes sweet, pumpkins, radicchio, radishes, rhubarb, rutabaga, salsify (oyster plant), scallions, seed - vegetable, shallots, spinach, squash, swiss chard, tannier, taro, tomatillos, tomatoes, truffles, turnip top (greens), turnips, yam, and yautia (malanga).

Q: Which fruits are eligible for CFAP 2?

A: The following fruits are eligible for CFAP 2: abiu, acerola (Barbados cherry), achachairu, antidesma, apples, apricots, aronia (chokeberry), atemoya (custard apple), bananas, blueberries, breadfruit, cacao, caimito, calabaza melon, canary melon, canary seed, caneberries, canistel, cantaloupes, carambola (star fruit), casaba melon, cherimoya (sugar apple), cherries, Chinese bitter melon, citron, citron melon, coconuts, cranberries, crenshaw melon, dates, donaqua (winter melon), durian, elderberries, figs, genip, gooseberries, grapefruit, grapes, ground cherrry, guamabana (soursop), guava, guavaberry, honeyberries, honeydew, huckleberries, Israel melons, jack fruit, jujube, juneberries, kiwiberry, kiwifruit, Korean golden melon, kumquats, langsat, lemons, limequats, limes, longan, loquats, lychee, mangos, mangosteen, mayhaw berries, mesple, mulberries, nectarines, oranges, papaya, passion fruits, pawpaw, peaches, pears, pineapple, pitaya (dragon fruit), plantain, plumcots, plums, pomegranates, prunes, pummelo, raisins, rambutan, sapodilla, sapote, schizandra berries, sprite melon, star gooseberry, strawberries, tangelos, tangerines, tangors, wampee, watermelon, wax jamboo fruit, and wolfberry (goji).

Q: Which other horticultural crops are eligible for CFAP 2?

A: The following horticulture is eligible for CFAP 2: anise, basil, cassava, chervil (Fresh parsley), chia, chicory (radicchio), cilantro, cinnamon, curry leaves, galanga, ginger, ginseng, guayule, herbs, hops, lotus root, marjoram, meadowfoam, mint, moringa, niger seed, oregano, parsley, pennycress, peppermint, pohole, psyllium, rosemary, sage, savory, shrubs (forbs), sorrel, spearmint, tangos, tea, thyme, turmeric, vanilla, wasabi, water cress, and yu cha.

Q: What aquaculture species are eligible for coverage under CFAP 2?

A: USDA will cover eligible aquaculture species grown and harvested from a controlled environment, including raceways, ponds, tanks, and recirculating systems. Any species of aquatic organisms grown as food for human consumption, fish raised as feed for fish that are consumed by humans, or ornamental fish propagated and reared in an aquatic medium is eligible. Eligible aquaculture species must be raised by a commercial operator, in water, and in a controlled environment. This includes molluscan shellfish and seaweed covered under the U.S. Department of Commerce CARES Act program.