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Energy

Optimizing energy usage on your operation can help you save money and more efficiently manage your operation while also protecting the soil and water resources on your land. Ways to optimize energy usage include maintaining farm equipment, improving insulation in facilities, and avoiding taking unnecessary trips across farm land.

Illustration of farm land with a barn

Get Assistance for Your Conservation Issues

Review common energy problems below and add issues you may be experiencing to My Conservation Concerns List. If you are experiencing other types of problems, continue to build your list by exploring the categories at the bottom of each page.

When you’re done, click Build Your List to finalize your list and get connected with free assistance from our conservation experts.

Inefficient Energy Use

Inefficient energy use of equipment and facilities

Add to Concerns List

Inefficient energy use of farm equipment or facilities can cause spending on energy to increase in order to meet production goals. This can occur when equipment operates more than needed, is outdated or improperly maintained, and when unimproved facilities, such as agricultural buildings, contribute to inefficient energy use when not adequately sealed and insulated.

"Photo of a rusty electric pump in a field"
An electric pump in a rice field in De Valls Bluff, Arkansas

Causes

  • Unvented, propane-fired heated systems
  • Throttling valves to control water flow
  • Using incandescent or T12 lights
  • Heat loss from building
  • Inefficient pumps

Possible Solutions

  • Convert to radiant heating
  • Add variable frequency drive pump
  • Replace with LED or T8 lighting
  • Install air barrier system and insulation
  • Replace with high efficiency pumps

Inefficient energy use in farming practices and field operations

Add to Concerns List

Inefficient field operations, such as taking unnecessary trips across the field or overlapping areas when applying fertilizer, can increase your energy costs and use of non-renewable energy sources. Money and energy can be saved by adopting practices that help reduce energy usage.

"Photo of a harvester crossing farm land"
A harvester crosses a field

Causes

  • Unnecessary trips across the field
  • Application of commercial fertilizer
  • Excessive insecticides
     

Possible Solutions

  • Convert to no-till
  • Plant nitrogen-fixing legumes
  • Implement a Pest Management System
     

Resources

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My Conservation Concerns List

The concerns you add will appear below. When you’re done adding issues, click the button below to finalize your list and find your local USDA Service Center.